For the past few months our colleague David Moises has been developing a new piece in the TUBA boatyards. Starting from a desire to build a submarine, veering past the idea of using a caravan as the basis body structure and ended up with a caravan diving bell for water arts.

Finally on the third try, the bottle gives up and explodes.

Today was the big day: the good ship (boat? sub?) finally left the shipyards. Although it is not really the launch, we decided that it was an important moment and that the vessel had to be christened. Sini Havukainen, our current practitioner in residence and collector of all matter of dirt and grime, was chosen as the appropriate person to do the duties. Second to David, she has done the most work on it, and a Finnish christening can be no bad thing.

Some Champagne was found, and Andrea did the research to ensure that the right text was being spoken. We all agreed that the bottle had to break. Although the idea that it is bad luck when the bottle doesn’t, so the boat would sink, but that that is actually a good thing for a submarine, meant that there was a certain pre-emptive acceptance of the idea that perhaps the bottle would not break.

Hanging a rope across the workshop outside area, then a second rope with a hangman’s noose for the  bottle, adjusting the lengths to give an optimal collision with the sharpest corner of the good vessel: so much work to ensure all would go well.

Sini recited the words:

ich taufe dich auf den namen karl stromberg
wünsche gute fahrt und immer eine handbreit wasser unter dem kiel (da has hat sini durch dadadada abgekürzt)
hiphip(hip)hurra

Then the swinging of the bottle and – bounce.

A second try… bounce. She has given it a fair go this time and it was a good dent left in the bow of the Karl Stromberg.

On the third try, excessive force was used and SUCCESS!

Let no one say that christening a boat is an easy thing to do!

With the neck of the champagne bottle still hanging on, the good boat Karl Stromberg is ready to head off for its maiden voyage into the depths of the lake in Steiermark (Styria).

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